Three things learnt from Paul Lambert’s debut as Stoke City manager

Three things learnt from Paul Lambert's debut as Stoke City manager

There were plenty of raised eyebrows around the Premier League, especially throughout ‘The Potteries’, when Stoke City announced that Paul Lambert would be succeeding Mark Hughes at Bet365 Stadium.

The 48-year-old former Norwich, Aston Villa and Wolverhampton Wanderers boss was certainly not at the top of the managerial wish list of many supporters and his recent achievements in the dugout would not have set many pulses racing, yet his reign got off to the best possible start on Saturday afternoon.

Goals from Joe Allen and Mame Biram Diouf secured a comfortable two-goal victory against Huddersfield Town in front of a raucous Bet365 Stadium, earning The Potters their first Premier League points since the respective reverse fixture during the Christmas period. The three points were enough to move Stoke out of the relegation zone and firmly established a feel-good factor around the club.

Here, The Boot Room highlight three things that we learnt from Paul Lambert’s first game in charge of Stoke City…

Back to basics

One of the factors that led to Mark Hughes’ departure was his persistence with playing a 3-4-3 system despite not having the personnel to suit the formation, exemplified by the fact that Mame Biram Diouf, a striker by trade, was shoe-horned in as a right wing-back. The team was unbalanced, stranded in a system that simply did not work and  gradually had their confidence eroded.

STEVEN GERRARD TO ASTON VILLA IS WRONG.

However, Paul Lambert’s first meaningful action as Stoke City manager was to go back to basics.

The 48-year-old deployed a 4-1-4-1 formation and selected the players that best suited the system. Darren Fletcher was deployed as the holding midfield player, Diouf’s pace and mobility was utilised in a striking role and the creative duo of Xherdan Shaqiri and Eric Maxim Choup-Moting were given the freedom to drive forward from their wide positions.

The central midfield trio of Fletcher, Joe Allenn and Charlie Adam were industrious and solid whilst the central defensive pairing of Ryan Shawcross and Kurt Zouma formed an impenetrable wall. Stoke have the unenviable record of having conceded more goals than any other top-flight team in Europe and this was their first clean sheet since October.

There was nothing complex or complicated about Lambert’s tactical decisions, but there did not need to be. It was back to basics and it worked perfectly.

Drive, desire and work rate

During the final months of Mark Hughes’ reign the performances of the team were increasingly ineffective and lethargic. This was exemplified by Xherdan Shaqiri, who was recently jeered by the Stoke City supporters after he made a half-heart attempt to retrieve an over-hit through ball against Newcastle United.

What a difference a new manager can make.

Based on Saturday’s performance Paul Lambert has re-enthused and re-motivated the Stoke players and there was a clear increase in energy, dynamism and work rate in his first match in charge. This was emphasised by the post-game statistics with the Staffordshire Sentinel reporting the team made 13% more sprints against Huddersfield Town than in the previous Premier League fixture against Newcastle.

In contrast to Hughes’ approach, which often saw the team surrendering possession and sitting deep in their own half, Lambert has instilled a playing style that is reliant on pressurising opponents all over the pitch. The drive, desire and intensity of the players on Saturday prevented the visitors from finding any kind of rhythm and Mame Biram Diouf’s goal came from is team mates winning the ball in the oppositions half.

Just to further underline the change in approach, mid-way through the second half Shaqiri chased an opponent thirty yards across the pitch before winning possession with a slide tackle. It was the perfect metaphor for the change of approach and attitude instilled by Lambert.

A new sense of togetherness

Paul Lambert’s name would certainly not have been top of many Stoke City supporter’s managerial wish lists following the dismissal of Mark Hughes, yet it was clear on Saturday that The Potters fanbase were fully behind their new manager.

Within moments of the game kicking off a chant of ‘Paul Lambert’s red and white army’ echoed around the ground and that set the tone in the stands. Supporters rolled back the years to create a loud, intimidating and fearsome atmosphere inside the Bet365 Stadium that has been absent in recent months.

It was a direct reaction to Lambert’s high intensity tactical approach and it was clear from his demeanour on the touchline that this opportunity means a great deal to him. He probably did more running up and down the touchline than some of his players but the crowd undoubtedly fed off his obvious energy and passion in the dugout – it was a complete contrast to the emotionless figure that Hughes often cut.

After the final whistle Lambert directed his players to walk across to the Boothen End of the ground to applaud the supporters and earn some Brownie points. Suddenly a club that looked so fractured just two weeks ago looks united both on and off the pitch.

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