Connect with us

Swindon Town

Swindon Town’s Massimo Luongo: A Star on the Rise



His club manager, Mark Cooper, thinks he’s Australia’s answer to David Beckham. His national team boss, Ange Postecoglou, thinks he has all the ability to play for the likes of Real Madrid or Barcelona. Whatever the truth of the matter, Massimo Luongo’s stock has skyrocketed in the past month or so, thanks to a number of stellar displays in the Asian Cup which lifted his native Australia to their first continental title, picking up the MVP award for the tournament along the way. That voices in the game – from those familiar with Luongo, to those who can only covet his services – are praising the Sydney-born, Swindon-based midfielder is testament to his performances over the past month in Asia, but also the months and years previous to that in the West Country.

As such, this recent development in Luongo’s career will have come as no surprise to fans of his club side, Swindon Town. Since March 2013 – when he originally signed on loan for the Robins – Luongo has been a key part of the Robins’ midfield, helping Swindon over the line into the League One playoffs in his first two months at the Wiltshire club, before signing with the club fully on Deadline Day in Summer 2013.

Fast forward a season and a half later, to another Deadline Day, and Luongo was the talk of the transfer market, tipped to make a big money move to various clubs across the United Kingdom, Europe or even in Asia, with an unnamed Qatari club making a bid. Cardiff were rumoured to have made a £3.5m bid, with the likes of Dortmund and Sevilla also monitoring Luongo’s transfer situation; ultimately, though, Swindon held firm on keeping their midfield star, foregoing the potential profits of a potential big money move in a bid to bolster their promotion campaign from England’s third tier.

So just how has Luongo – a player called up to the World Cup squad in 2014 as a bid to look towards the future – made the jump from one of Australia’s bright young prospects to the real deal, in the space of just a few months?

A large part of the transition has to be put down to Swindon Town and their owner, Lee Power. Power played a vital role in bringing Luongo to the club, his original loan signing coming as a result of a link between Power and Luongo’s previous club, Tottenham Hotspur’s then-Under 21 Manager Tim Sherwood, but Power also played an important role in Luongo’s career even earlier, helping bring the young Australian to White Hart Lane.

His subsequent move to the County Ground has meant that he has been able to make the step into regular first team football, having not had much of a chance at Spurs – his only appearance for them coming as a substitute in a League Cup loss to Stoke. He has been a virtual ever-present when fit for Swindon, which has, in turn, meant he has had to learn to add consistency to his game. Consistency is a key aspect of the game for a young midfielder, who can only really start to demand game time when it’s certain he has the stamina, as well as the obvious raw abilities, to make winning the game more likely.

In this sense, while the start of last season began very well for Luongo, towards the halfway point of the campaign he looked notably tired, unable to affect games with the vigour with which he had done in the autumn months. This can be taken as a criticism, but in truth is more a reality of a young professional in his first full season; the talent was never in doubt, but it was clear that there was more to come from Luongo – as well as a number of his young teammates – which couldn’t perhaps be delivered thanks to the fatigue built up over a gruelling league season.

After some rest in the early spring, however, Luongo finished the season strongly, eventually earning the space in the Socceroos’ World Cup squad in Brazil. This was somewhat of a surprise, though not undeserved – more in the sense that Luongo had only ever appeared to be on Australian national team coach Ange Postecoglou’s radar since the beginning of the calendar year of 2014.

So a first full season of professional football was enough to get Luongo on Postecoglou and the Socceroos’ radar, and improve the Australian prospect’s consistency, so what of his second season?

Luongo has only gone on to bigger and better things since taking part in the World Cup last summer, playing an even bigger role in a better Swindon side – one which has been near the upper regions of the table since almost day one of the season – and becoming a starting player for his national side too. His season started almost perfectly with a goal on the opening day against Scunthorpe, and despite a lack of goalscoring form – he didn’t manage to register a second goal until December – Luongo’s stature has only risen, carrying his team forward excellently throughout the season, playing a leading role in Swindon’s push for Championship football next season.

The big headlines of recent weeks may have been made by Luongo with his national team – and, given that he scored twice, assisted four goals and achieved the tournament’s MVP award over the six game tournament, for good reason – but it’s clear that his rise to the darling of Australian football is no flash in the pan; instead, Luongo’s success has just been a story waiting to happen for some time now. Given that he’ll stay at Swindon for the rest of the season, there’ll be an onus on him to kick on and help the rest of his team to promotion come May. Where Luongo’s path will go then isn’t obvious – the world is, to use a cliché, his oyster – but his future is almost certainly going to be a bright one.

Conor is a lifelong fan of Swindon Town. He hosts Dreierpack Podcast, a podcast about the Bundesliga, and writes about Borussia Mönchengladbach for the Bundesliga Fanatic.

Swindon Town

Derby defeat to Cheltenham highlights wider issues for Swindon Town

The misery at the County Ground looks set to continue.



Photo: Getty Images

Swindon Town were humiliated on home turf on Saturday afternoon as local rivals Cheltenham Town succumbed the Robins to a 3-0 defeat. This match represented the start to life at the County Ground post-David Flitcroft, with player-manager Matty Taylor in interim control.

A stunning Jake Andrews’ free-kick and a brace from Mohamed Eisa earned Cheltenham victory and condemned Taylor to a losing start as Swindon temporary boss.

Many would have expected the 36-year-old to see out the game from the touchline, but his inclusion in the starting line-up suggests he is still a long way from hanging up his boots and reluctant to fulfill a management position on a full-time basis.

As Power’s comments to BBC Wiltshire in midweek alluded, this is likely to be the former Burnley man’s only match in caretaker control, but the weekend’s performance further emphasized the underlying issues that plague the Wiltshire outfit.

The first ten minutes looked promising, with Town full of intent, putting together some promising passing moves. The football being played in the very early stages looked a far cry from the receive-panic-hoof that the County Ground faithful were subject to under David Flitcroft.

However, what followed can only be described as a capitulation. The next 80 minutes comprised of a lack of passion, bravery and a sense of cluelessness in possession. Whenever the Robins were able to recycle play, the first instinct was to pump the ball forward for Luke Norris and Marc Richards to chase.

In the end, it was just another bump in the road of a miserable season. An abject home performance that displayed little fight or spirit. Interim boss Taylor is by no means to blame – he was one of the better performers on the day, after all – but it is a sign of things to come between now and May.

The supporters remain disillusioned.

Taylor’s appointment – albeit temporary – was seen as a breath of fresh air. The articulate Football League veteran has quickly become a crowd favourite at the County Ground and there was a sense of optimism that he could be the man to turn the club’s fortunes. But Saturday’s performance saw no change.

Former Southend boss, Phil Brown, remains the leading contender for the vacant managerial role. Like Flitcroft, he is the type who will come into the club and look to dictate from the top down, embedding his style both on and off the pitch. However, his win percentage of 35.5% will concern Town fans.

The club still remains in the mix for promotion, just two points off the play-off places, with 30 points to play for. Nonetheless, early season murmurings of a return to Sky Bet League One remain nothing but a fantasy.

Dave Flitcroft’s sudden departure has left the club in a troubling position, no doubt, but the state of play on the pitch has not been impacted by the former head coach’s exit to Mansfield.

The current squad is abject, with too many expecting to be carried by their teammates, and the state of competition at the top of the table is too great.

This lack of passion on the pitch is synonymous with a failure on behalf of the club hierarchy. Just 90 minutes away from promotion to the Sky Bet Championship three seasons ago, Swindon has suffered from a chronic lack of investment and a negligence of transparency, which has served to ostracise those who pay the gates.

Chairman Lee Power continues to fail in his duty of care, seemingly content in overseeing the club’s plight down the Football League.

Continue Reading


Ollie Banks – A fresh start in the Football League at Swindon Town



Swindon Town manager David Flitcroft described on-loan midfielder Ollie Banks as a “top, top, top player” after his first appearance for the County Ground outfit.

Officially announced as a Town player the Friday morning before the Robins’ Saturday League Two fixture, Banks went on to play a starring role in his new side’s 1-0 victory over local rivals Forest Green, following which he collected the afternoon’s Man of the Match accolade.

The 25-year-old midfielder, who joined the club on a temporary basis from League One side Oldham, had found first-team chances hard to come by with his parent club and spent a short spell on loan at Tranmere Rovers, where he impressed for the National League outfit.

Speaking to The Boot Room, in an exclusive interview, he explained the rationale behind his move to Swindon and the role manager David Flitcroft had to play.

“I finished my loan at Tranmere and they offered me a deal to stay. I really enjoyed my time there. It is a brilliant club. But I wanted to get back into the Football League. I told Micky Mellon that I needed to give myself the best chance I could and I didn’t want to jump into any decision.

I waited for a few days after speaking to Micky, then Dave Flitcroft at Swindon rang me. He said he wanted me to come down and express myself and get the club where it needs to be. From there it was quite an easy decision to move down South.”

After a mixed start to the campaign for Swindon, who occupy eighth position in League Two at the time of writing, the January transfer window was always set to be a period of reinforcement for the club. New signings were required to strengthen the starting XI and enforce a sense of consistency, particularly to rectify a miserable home record of four wins in 13 league matches (prior to the new year).

Flitcroft’s background in scouting and recruitment has been a regular feature since he took the County Ground hot seat. His quest to bring the required quality of player, while ensuring the right characters and mix of temperaments remain at the club, has seen him turn to trusted peers, both in his playing and back room staff.

For the former Bury manager, recruitment is the key to success. Every deal has to be deemed the correct move for the club and this was no different in the case of Banks. Long-term and thoughtfully considered interest in the 25-year-old resulted in an offer being made for his services, as he revealed:

“Flitcroft said he has always kept track of me and tried to sign me a few times before. It is always important to have a manager who believes in you and likes you as a player. To have the backing of the manager is a huge plus. It allows you to go out with confidence and put good performances in.” 

Banks’ move to Swindon has represented new challenges to the 25-year-old, not least the prospect of living away from what he considers ‘home’.

Having always plied his trade in the north of England, most recently with FC United of Manchester, Chesterfield, Northampton Town, Oldham and Tranmere, this is the first time he has featured for a club in the southern counties.

“The move has been different, to be honest. I have never really had to live away from home, so it has been a bit strange, but I’ve enjoyed it. The lads and the gaffer have been really welcoming.

Banks made little of his role in debut victory over Forest Green Rovers. Nonetheless, his references to the competitive nature of the play-off race make both his and Swindon’s objectives for the end of the season glaringly obvious:

“It felt good to get Man of the Match, but there were a few good performers on our team and just to get three points in a local derby was a big thing. With it being so tight at the top of the league three points was the main aim, but to settle in so quickly is always a bonus.”

The central midfielder already has one League Two promotion on his CV, having won the title with Chesterfield in the 2013-14 season. Like all those associated with Swindon, he will be hoping to add another before the end of the current campaign.

Keen to be a figurehead throughout the club’s promotion charge, Banks followed up his debut heroics with Swindon’s only goal in Saturday’s 3-1 defeat to Coventry. Having fallen 2-0 behind after just 22 minutes, the 25-year-old slid onto the end of a low cross into the six-yard box to pull one back for the Robins.

This strike was to no avail, as Coventry proceeded to score a third late into the second half, but it was perhaps a sign of things to come from the Oldham loanee. Not typically know for his escapades in the final third, he is hoping to add goals to his game at the County Ground.

“I prefer playing slightly further forward, as it means you do have chances to get on the scoresheet. I’ve been playing a bit deeper throughout the last few years and I’ve found goals quite hard to come by, but hopefully playing a more advanced role under Flitcroft could lead to a few more goals.”

Bringing a creative spark and eye for a pass in the middle of the park, Banks’ has shown his ability to take up decent positions around the box too. Since his arrival, he has stood out in a Swindon midfield lacking a real presence, helping his side to two wins in three appearances – including a remarkable 4-3 comeback victory over Crewe Alexandra on Saturday afternoon.

The 25-year-old scored once in eight appearances during his time at Tranmere, impressing for the Merseyside outfit. The club, who currently occupying 5th place in the National League, had managed just three victories in eight matches leading up to his arrival, compared to the five matches won with the 25-year-old in the squad. Nonetheless, he underplayed his influence.

“A few weeks before I joined a few of the boys were saying that they weren’t taking their chances. I would be very naive to believe it was all my doing, the way lucked change, but I think the team just started taking chances were they previously hadn’t. That was the main factor.”

Rovers had been crying out for a player willing to take an unselfish role in the centre of the park and Banks provided this. Despite the short term nature of his move, he was able to strike a positive partnership with fellow midfielder Ollie Norburn, for whom he was full of praise.

“I would actually say that he [Norburn] is one of the best midfielders that I have played with for a while. He likes to get about and leave the middle of the pitch more that many midfielders do, so it became my job to hold a deeper role in midfield and work from there. “

Banks knows too well the trials and tribulations of the Football League and the volatility that comes with playing in the lower divisions. From being a regular starter at Oldham, under manager John Sheridan, to being a fringe player following Richie Wellens’ arrival, he found himself low in self-belief and in need of a fresh start.

Having made 33 League One appearances for the Latics in 2016/17, the 25-year-old had been limited to just seven first team appearances in the same competition this year. Ultimately, the November move to Tranmere made sense for all parties:

“Confidence was a major thing, especially personally. The spirit that we had from the backend of the season before didn’t seem to be there. You can go into all sorts of details as to why things didn’t work, but ultimately we just weren’t getting the results that we had before.”

“Richie Wellens came in and he didn’t fancy me as a player, so you just move on and hope that it works out elsewhere.”

With a year remaining on his contract at Oldham it seems unlikely that Banks will extend his current deal at Boundary Park. When questioned on the chances of signing a new contract with the Latics, he was answered, “I highly doubt that I will be extending, to be honest.” 

Instead, he will use the remainder of his time at the County Ground to prove his worth of a move elsewhere and, having made a positive impression just a few weeks into his spell at the club, interest from the Football League is likely to be high.

David Flitcroft is a man with an edge when it comes to scouting and recruitment. To be praised so highly by the Swindon head coach, after just two days at the club, is good indication of what is to come for the humble, but highly talented midfielder.

Continue Reading


Exclusive: Tom Smith talks Flitcroft, Bath City and becoming a Swindon Town regular



Tom Smith

‘Wise beyond his years’ would undoubtedly fall under the category of overused football clichés, but it is perhaps the best way to describe Swindon Town’s Tom Smith, the 19-year-old currently on loan at National League South outfit Bath City.

“I’ve been there since I was eight/nine years old, coming all the way up through the academy, seeing everything that has been going on with the first team squad,” said the highly-rated midfielder, as he reminisced on his childhood spent admiring the club he has come to call home.

“I always used to watch the games thinking, “I could be out there one day”,” he professed. “There is no better feeling than stepping out to the County Ground. Is always where I wanted to be growing up.”

After seven years spent progressing through the Swindon Town youth system, Smith was handed his first professional contract with the Wiltshire outfit in the summer of 2014, before making his debut under manager Mark Cooper as a first-year scholar in 2015.

An appearance as a second half-substitute against Preston North End at the end of the 2014/15 campaign would mark his first outing for the club before he went on to score his first goal for the Robins in a 3-1 victory over Crewe Alexandra the season after.

A difficult 2015/16 season at the County Ground would lead to the sacking of Cooper. However, his successor, Luke Williams, would go on to reward Smith’s hard work with a run of first-team appearances throughout 2016/17.

This would be the year that Smith began to establish himself as a squad player at Swindon, but one that would ultimately lead to the club’s relegation. The midfielder featured 12 times in total for the Robins, earning himself seven starts.

Naturally, the loss of the club’s League One status led to the dismissal of Williams in May and a month-long wait for a new manager ensued before the Robins finally settled on the appointment of David Flitcroft.

Flitcroft’s arrival has seen a change in the wind at the County Ground and the new Robins boss has influenced a significant turn around in the club’s fortunes in the five months he has held the position.

The summer window saw an almost-complete overhaul, with 16 senior players arriving and just six surviving from the 2016/17 squad that suffered relegation to the fourth tier. This makeover has reaped its rewards thus far, with Town sitting comfortably in the League Two play-off places while boasting the best form in the division, and Smith was quick to praise the early work of his new manager:

“He has brought in a number of new players, but we needed it. A number of those players have really stepped up over the last month or so, and no we’re on a bit of a run. We have recently had back to back wins and a really good away record.”

While the club’s current standing is a delight for all fans to see, improved team performances led to fewer playing opportunities for Smith. It was, therefore, no surprise to see him depart on loan a month into the season.

“I was getting in the squad, but dipping in and out on the fringes,” Smith explained. “This is a big season for me, following on from the last couple, and I need to build on that. It was a no-brainer going out on loan somewhere.”

National League South side, Bath City, would be the eventual destination for the midfielder, after “ongoing discussions” that lasted “a couple of weeks”, to ensure the move was correct for all parties.

Smith, clearly recognising the need to be playing regular football in order to ensure continued development, stated: “On a personal level, I just needed to get out on loan and play games. There is nothing better, being young, just playing games. 

“They have a good set-up down there. I went there to get games, experience and get my confidence back. Jerry and Bath City have helped me to kick start my football again.”

Smith certainly appears to have regained his self-belief and has made quite the impression at Twerton Park, where he has linked up with new Romans boss Jerry Gill. He has won two man of the match awards since his arrival in October while contributing two goals in his eight appearances.

The youngster stated his desire to add goals and assists to his game and will hope his improved efforts in the final third have caught the eye of Flitcroft. The Swindon boss made it clear that the midfielder remains in his long-term plans, giving him even greater motivation to impress while away from the club.

“We had a conversation before I went on loan,” Smith explained. “The idea is for me to get out and get experience playing, rather than just being stagnant around the squad. I am a Swindon player, born and bred, and long-term there will always be an option for me to be used.”

This involvement is critical for a player of Smith’s age, who is still adapting since his graduation from the Swindon Town Academy. Despite being around the first team set-up for three years now, fans would be forgiven for forgetting that the 19-year-old has made just 10 league appearances for the club. He looked to be on the verge of establishing a regular spot for the Robins last term before injury hampered his progress.

“I was getting a run of games and that really helped me push on and cement my place. I played against Rochdale at home, when we won 3-0, and I did well, but I actually got injured after that game.

“As a young player you have to take your opportunities, but sometimes when you do get injured you lose that place in the squad, whereas a more experienced player might come straight back,” Smith admitted. “It is a difficult one, as I was doing well at the time, but things come up and things change.”

However, having accepted that injuries are part and parcel of the game, Smith was determined to bounce back and reclaim his spot in the squad, even if it required a temporary loan move along the way. He thoughtfully stated, “You can’t really control what happens. You just have to get on with it and keep working hard.”

After initially arriving at Bath City on a one-month deal, the club were delighted to extend Smith’s stay until after the New Year. This comes as little surprise considering his early performances for the Romans. It is clear that he thrives on playing matches and his displays have proven key to the club cementing a comfortable mid-table position in the National League South.

Of course, this is not the first loan move of Smith’s career. Last season the 19-year-old spent a brief spell out on loan with League of Ireland First Division outfit Waterford, where he proved vital in the club’s successful push for promotion, alongside Town teammate Jake Evans.

“It was a similar situation to the beginning of this season. Come January the club brought in new players and it meant I probably wasn’t going to get in the squad. I needed to continue playing games and continue doing well, in order to make it a good season. Despite looking at other clubs in England, everything just fell into place behind the scenes.”

Moving to a new league, in a new country, represented a fresh challenge for Smith. However, it is one that saw him thrive. He made 11 appearances for the club, scoring a single goal in a 2–0 away victory over UCD.

It ended up being a really good move for me. It was my first loan and a really great experience. We had to fly out there and live away from home. I got to meet loads of new people and experience a different style of football.

Seemingly, the canvas for Smith has always been painted red. The long-term ambition for the teenage midfielder is to establish himself as a first-team regular at the County Ground. Everything he does in the meantime is in pursuit of realising that goal.

“With playing games and getting experience, I think my time will come. It would be nice this year, or maybe the year after, to play in a Swindon shirt regularly.”

Smith still looks back with fond memories of his time as a ball boy for the Robins. In particular, he recollects the excitement of the Paulo di Canio era, but he never envisaged himself gracing the same turf as those he considered his childhood heroes.

“Looking out onto the pitch I just couldn’t ever imagine myself being there. It seemed so far away.” 

Being a Swindon Town first team regular may have been little more than a fantasy for a 13-year-old Tom Smith. Now, into his third year as a pro, he is closer than he ever would have expected. Despite all this, he remains grounded. Determined as ever to prove his worth at the club that has been a substantial influence in his life, to date.

“It is a weird thing, thinking I’m so close to being a regular. For me, being at a young age, I need to take a step back from everything, remember I am a young player, and keep working hard.”

Continue Reading


Copyright © 2017 The Boot Room.